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Marketplace Requests for IPM-Grown Food: An Update

Statistics indicate upward trend

The concept of IPM-labeled produce was first addressed in an IPM annual report in 1997, in an article entitled "The Marketplace Calls for Environmental Stewardship." Initiated in New York by a Rochester-based food retailer, the IPM labeling movement has grown exponentially, not only within New York but nationally.

Trends for New York are shown here in the form of statistics from 1996 and 1997 (with estimates for 1998), gathered for food processing companies by an independent evaluator. Data for fresh-market crops are not yet available. These statistics show increases in the numbers of growers and acres producing crops for IPM labeling and a decrease in the environmental impact of growing these crops. Crops showing higher environmental impacts in 1997 than in 1996 faced increased pest pressures in 1997.

Points are scored for each of the IPM practices these growers use in producing crops for IPM labeling. Each grower must achieve a baseline score in order to qualify. All of the growers currently growing for IPM labeling have scored at or above the 80 percent level each year. Data from several crops in New York show that 80 percent adoption of the IPM practices prescribed for these crops (the "IPM elements") will result in pesticide use reductions of 30 to 50 percent.

New York State producers growing for IPM labeling:
31 in 1996; 118 in 1997; 152 in 1998 (est.)

New York State acres growing IPM-labeled produce:
3,490 in 1996; 8,092 in 1997; 9,029 in 1998 (est.)

Trends in reducing the environmental impact of growing processing crops, as measured by the Environmental Impact Quotient (EIQ):

Crop

EIQ Values ‘96

EIQ Values ‘97

beets

72

66

carrots

258

173

kraut cabbage

45

74

peas

23

27

snap beans

114

110

sweet corn

136

119