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New York Agriculture Industry $upports IPM

Some of the funds for IPM research and educational outreach programs in New York state are coming from the pockets of growers and their organizations.

The ever-increasing confidence of New York's growers in IPM evidences itself in many ways. One of the most tangible of these is the steady flow of dollars from growers to support IPM-related research and implementation work. While the state of New York funds many of these IPM projects, agricultural producers also provide funds to support certain projects.

Agricultural producers also spend their own funds to obtain IPM advice and guidance. They hire the services of private crop consultants or pay for IPM services through their crop management associations. In some parts of the state where neither of these options is available, producers have prevailed upon local Cornell Cooperative Extension offices to use producer funds to coordinate IPM services. Table 1 shows that in 1996 New York agricultural producers spent an estimated one million dollars of their own resources to obtain IPM services and advice. The numbers in table 1 are tangible evidence of the significant interest shown by the agricultural community in supporting IPM.

Table 1. IPM Services Purchased by Growers in 1996

Source of IPM Services

IPM Service Providers

Acres Served (estimates)

Growers Receiving IPM Services

Grower Payments for IPM Services
(estimates)

private crop consultants

30

88,670

986

$628,625

grower associations/ cooperatives

6

67,005

728

$317,535

extension-coordinated services

24

29,852

2,896

$30,533

Crop checkoff programs are another avenue of producer support for IPM. Many producers have organized crop checkoff programs that set aside money they would normally put in their own pockets as profit from their crops. This set-aside money goes into a fund for research and extension projects that seek answers to the problems producers face. The fund also supports educational outreach projects that demonstrate and explain new information to producers. Growers of cabbage, apples, sweet corn, snap beans, grapes, and several other commodities have used their checkoff funds to support IPM projects.